WOMEN IN THE U.S. MILITARY: AMERICAN REVOLUTION TO THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR

Via: Texas Veterans BlogMarch is Women’s History Month, but here in Texas it’s also Women Veterans Month, and we celebrate their long and distinguished history serving in the U.S. Military. As early as the American Revolution, women have stood alongside men, behind the scenes and on the front line, with courage and determination

American Revolution

The women who supported the Continental Army were often disparaged as “camp followers,” because they served the soldiers and officers as washerwomen, cooks, and seamstresses, but some even acted as soldiers and spies. Many of these women followed the army because their husbands were soldiers in the regiments.

Margaret Cochran Corbin was married to John Corbin, a trained artilleryman and one of 600 American soldiers defending Fort Washington from 4,000 Hessian troops under British command. Because she was a nurse, Margaret was permitted to join her husband in battle to provide support to injured soldiers. When John Corbin was killed at his cannon, she immediately stepped in and resumed firing the cannon in his place until she herself grievously wounded. On July 6, 1779, the Continental Congress granted her money equal to one-half the pay drawn by a soldier and one suit of clothes. Margaret was the first American woman to receive a military pension and is buried at West Point.

Civil War

Women filled many of the same roles listed above for the Union and Confederate forces. In addition, women nurses and matrons staffed government and regimental hospitals for the Union and Confederacy, and at least one was an acting assistant surgeon who tended to the wounded. Female nurses and spies also worked near the front lines. They also served disguised as male soldiers fighting at the front. Historians have documented roughly 250 female Civil War soldiers, and there were certainly more, who participated in every major battle.

 

In 1861, after the death of her husband, who was an officer with the Texas United States Army, Loreta Janeta Velàzquez enlisted in the Confederate States Army as Henry T. Buford and went on to fight at Bull Run, Ball’s Bluff and Fort Donelson. While in New Orleans, her real gender was detected and she was discharged, however, she reenlisted and fought at the Battle of Shiloh in April, 1862. Afterwards, she was exposed again and became a Confederate spy and later, a double agent for the U.S. Secret Service. While she worked as a spy, Loreta was sometimes disguised as a man and other times as a woman. Loreta was married and widowed three more times, and died in January, 1923.

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Spanish-American War

After the Battleship Maine exploded in the Havana Harbor and the Battle of San Juan Hill in Cuba, wounded American soldiers were kept in very unsanitary conditions. Typhoid and Yellow Fever were rampant and there were few experienced medical personnel available. The Army Nurse Corps was comprised of more than 1,500 nurses who were paid thirty dollars a month, but held no military status. They served in post and camp hospitals and on hospital ships from 1898 to 1901.

Dita Hopkins Kinney, a former contract nurse, became the first Superintendent of the Army Nurse Corps in 1901. Esther Voorhees Hasson, one of the relief nurses during the war, became the first Superintendent of the Navy Nurse Corps in 1908. Ellen May Tower, a U.S. Army nurse from Byron, Michigan, died of Typhoid in Puerto Rico during the war. She was the first nurse to die on foreign soil and the first woman to receive a military funeral in Michigan.

SPRING QUARTERLY FORFEITED LAND SALE NOW OPEN

Via: Texas Veterans Blog

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Since 1946, Texas Veterans have been able to finance land purchases on favorable terms through the Texas Veterans Land Board (VLB). While the vast majority of Veteran borrowers keep current on their payments, a few must return land to the VLB. These forfeited land tracts are offered first to Texas Veterans and military members through Quarterly Online Land Sales (Type I Forfeited Land Sales).

The current sale features 15 tracts in 15 counties, totaling more than 109 acres. Available tracts can be viewed at TexasVeterans.com, where all bids must be placed by April 25, 2017 at 5 p.m. central time. A Veteran or military member whose bid is accepted may apply for a VLB land loan for 30 years at a 7.25% interest rate with a minimum 5% down payment. The land loan limit is $150,000.

Bids for land tracts may be submitted through our easy and safe online bidding system. It also gives you more control over the bidding process. Once you find a piece of VLB forfeited land, the VLB website will direct you to either create a new online bidding account, or sign in to an existing account. For those military service members and Veterans new to this method of bidding, we have created a user-friendly step-by-step Quick Start Guide that will walk you through the entire process. You can now rank individual bids based on preference, change the bid amount, or delete an entire bid with a few keystrokes. Up to six bids may be placed by a single buyer. Detailed information on the sales process can be found in the Type I Forfeited Land Sale Handbook.

Please note that tracts may be added or withdrawn by the VLB at any time, for any reason. Tracts that do not sell during the quarterly sales are made available to all Texas residents as part of the Ongoing Land Sale (Type II Forfeited Land Sale). VLB land loans are available for these tracts to non-Veterans at the interest rate of 7.75%.

Your Texas VLB land loan benefit can be used toward VLB forfeited land tracts or other properties of one acre or more anywhere in Texas. If you have questions about bidding offline or online, please contact the VLB at 1-800-252-8387 or vlbinfo@glo.texas.gov. Stay up to date on Quarterly Online Land Sales: text VLB, your name and zip code to 67076.

If there are no forfeited land tracts that interest you, please consider property search websites that list land for sale in Texas, or contact a VLB approved real estate professional.